Recent comments

Richard Gunton on Welcome to the University of Babylon! (Saturday 16th September 2017 10:11pm)

Glad you enjoyed these posts, Patricia.  And congratulations on beginning the PhD studies - I hope they're getting off to a good start!

Patricia Gray on Welcome to the University of Babylon! (Tuesday 22nd August 2017 3:16am)

Thanks for some very interesting and stimulating reports from the conference Eline. I am enjoying them...and for your comment this time Richard. It becomes all the more relevant to keep in mind as I begin my own part-time PhD this September as well as continuing in my work role to support others!

Richard Gunton on A Christian academic booklist (Monday 21st August 2017 8:16pm)

Thanks for your comment, Gillian. I was aiming with this list to compile a list of books that are accessible to the newcomer to Christian philosophy. Much as I find Danie Strauss' PDD illuminating and admire its comprehensive scope and vision, its length, technicality and structure dissuaded me from recommending it in this list. I wonder if someone could produce an illustrated overview of Danie's thought in 200 pages or less... any suggestions?

Richard Gunton on Welcome to the University of Babylon! (Monday 21st August 2017 8:05pm)

The case of Daniel and friends at the University of Babylon is fascinating and inspiring.  But it's interesting how this talk highlighted the possibility of a Christian's studies challenging his or her faith.  In the biblical account, I don't see Daniel's faith being challenged - quite the converse. First this Jewish man's robust worldview challenged the dietary arrangements of his campus, and to great acclaim; then later on his ministry would deeply challenge the political structures and strategies of his host state, calling whole legal systems into question.

john quinn on Inspiring Story of Brazilian Footballer Gilberto Silva (Saturday 22nd July 2017 8:24pm)

GILBERTO SILVA IS A FANTASTIC ROLE MODEL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE...HIS LIFE AND EXPERIENCES SHOULD BE HIGHLIGHTED MORE...TO THIS DAY HE IS STILL A MAN WITH A MESSAGE ..HUMILITY.... TO WORK HARD BUT WITH HUMILITY..

Gillian Cameron on A Christian academic booklist (Tuesday 18th July 2017 11:09am)

Thanks for helpful list. Any reason why D.F.M.Strauss's 'Philosophy as The Discipline of The Disciplines' failed to make the list?

David Hanson on Are we called to be academics? (Saturday 1st July 2017 5:20pm)

Hi, Alicia.
Helpful / unhelpful?
If Scripture's intent is redemptive, we should expect its systemic interest in calling to be the summons to repentance, holiness and salvation. For OT (aimed at God's covenant people, Israel) and NT (aimed now globally, also to those who were once strangers to His covenant) the aim of repentance is "redemption", "restitution", "regeneration", "restoration", "reconciliation", "renewal": - the re-establishment of right relationships with our Creator, neighbours and planet.

Rudi on Are we called to be academics? (Monday 26th June 2017 9:42pm)

I think you're hitting on a very important point. We need to stop worrying about whether the job or situation we are now in is our actual "calling". While we must all face life choices, we should be wary, I think, of believing that it is of utmost importance to God whether I stay here, or move abroad. Whether I take this job or that, etc. The more important decision is to answer the call to repentance, salvation and holiness in whatever situation we're in.

Eline van Asperen on Richard Middleton on the royal human task (Wednesday 24th May 2017 9:38am)

Thanks Alicia! Yes, the construction metaphor is quite a helpful one. And it links nicely with the New Testament metaphor of people as living stones as well.

Alicia Smith on Richard Middleton on the royal human task (Monday 22nd May 2017 11:50am)

Thanks for this Eline! We enjoyed Richard's talk when he gave it at the Graduate Christian Forum here in Oxford. I love the idea of creation as a building, and of our creative (/academic) work as a smaller kind of construction - it seems to me that using this as a major metaphor helps us keep an appropriate scholarly humility by seeing the work as a public, useful edifice which others can contribute to, rather than an expression of personal genius.