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Following on from the first post a few weeks ago, here's the second of three posts summarizing the talks from Transforming the Mind 2017. This week we're looking at Mike Clifford's talk, which took the experience of Daniel and his friends in Babylon as the starting point.

Daniel was a young man who was taken away from his country and his family and moved to a new culture with different rules. There he was enrolled in a three-year course of study in 'every kind of learning', and especially language and literature. Feels familiar to some of you? Maybe you have moved away from your family and friends, and even your country, to pursue your course of study, although I suspect most of us did this by free choice rather than under duress! Daniel and his friends were fully immersed in everything the culture of Babylon had to offer. Some of the things they learned were good and useful, but other aspects of their programme of study may have deliberately aimed to assimilate them into the culture of Babylon, to change their worldview. What would their families have thought about that? Likewise, Christians in academia can feel caught in the middle: on the one hand there is the pressure to conform to the secular mould of society, and on the other hand there can be pressure from a Christian subculture that does not always value learning. Still, Daniel and his friends embarked on this course of study, and God used them not only to witness to the king of Babylon and his court, but he also helped them to develop the gifts and talents they had been given (Dan. 1:4). How are you using your gifts in your studies? How do you explain the importance of your studies to your church family? And how can you serve in your society without losing your identity in Christ?

Reconstruction of the Ishtar Gate of Babylon in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin; © Creative Commons CC BY-SA 4.0

In this Babylonian environment, Daniel and his friends made sure they stayed in contact with God. Despite losing their home and even their names, through their distinctive diet (ch. 1), worship (ch. 3) and prayer (ch. 6) they not only survived but thrived (Dan. 1:15). What helps you to survive and thrive in your academic environment? What practices help you to keep in touch with God and his calling on your life in the midst of your research?

Daniel did not rebel against his programme of study. During their three years of study, God gave Daniel and his friends knowledge and understanding of the things they were learning – 'all kinds of literature and learning' (Dan. 1:17) – so that they outdid all the other students (Dan. 1:20). Of course we should not expect to always be the best student. After all, God placed Daniel in Babylon for a very specific purpose. But it does mean we can ask God to bless us in our research, and to help us to understand what we are studying. At times our studies may challenge our faith, but the university can also be a place where our faith is tested and refined. Like Daniel, we need to be aware of which aspects of our discipline are in tension with our faith, and seek to engage with these faithfully, following the call of God on our lives.

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Comments

The case of Daniel and friends at the University of Babylon is fascinating and inspiring.  But it's interesting how this talk highlighted the possibility of a Christian's studies challenging his or her faith.  In the biblical account, I don't see Daniel's faith being challenged - quite the converse. First this Jewish man's robust worldview challenged the dietary arrangements of his campus, and to great acclaim; then later on his ministry would deeply challenge the political structures and strategies of his host state, calling whole legal systems into question.  Finally the book of Daniel gives futuristic prophetic visions that seem to shake the created order to its foundations - leaving us in no doubt which way round the challenge goes!  Our studies will be testing, no doubt, but why not aim to be the most successful students by God's standards - not just to survive, but to make history?

Thanks for some very interesting and stimulating reports from the conference Eline. I am enjoying them...and for your comment this time Richard. It becomes all the more relevant to keep in mind as I begin my own part-time PhD this September as well as continuing in my work role to support others!

Glad you enjoyed these posts, Patricia.  And congratulations on beginning the PhD studies - I hope they're getting off to a good start!

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