Nico Rosberg, the current Formula 1 World Champion was educated in an international school in Monaco and it was here that he was indoctrinated into the insidious, dark and brooding materialism that pervades our culture. Life boils down to matter in motion.

‘I was always thinking in school, “What the hell am I doing this physics for?”,’ Rosberg confessed to a journalist. ‘But now I know the answer because I benefit from it every single day in my job. Everything relates to physics and maths: what is the car doing and how do we change it?’

It’s fascinating that the articulate Rosberg seems oblivious to the dark implications of his materialist worldview and he, cheerfully and incoherently, adds in some Hollywood ‘feel-good’ slogans to his secular faith.

“I’m following my heart,” he said when breaking the news of his retirement. “My heart is telling me this.”

How could we begin a conversation about the Christian faith with Nico? You could do a lot worse than tell him the Eric Harris story.

Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold shot 12 students and a teacher at Columbine High School, Colorado, USA, on 20th April 1999. Eric wrote in his diary:

just because your mommy and daddy tell you blood and violence is bad, you think it’s a f—g law of nature? wrong, only science and math are true, everything else, and I mean every f—g thing else is man made.

The belief that only the natural sciences hook onto reality is a key article of faith for many materialist believers. If only ‘nature’ exists then the only things we can believe in are those things that can be measured by scientific equipment. This leads to the conclusion that moral statements such as ‘murder is wrong’ are human constructs and empty of any genuine truth.

So do we agree with Eric Harris that only maths and physics tell us about the world? Press home the point. Where exactly did he go wrong?

I’d love to ask Nico how he would respond to this tragic story?

Mark Roques
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Mark Roques

Mark taught Philosophy and Religious Education at Prior Park College, Bath, for many years. As Director of RealityBites he has developed a rich range of resources for youth workers and teachers. He has spoken at conferences in the UK, Holland, South Korea, Spain, Australia and New Zealand. Mark is a lively storyteller and the author of four books, including The Spy, the Rat and the Bed of Nails: Creative Ways of Talking about Christian Faith. His work is focused on storytelling and how this can help us to communicate the Christian faith. He has written many articles for the Baptist Times, RE Today, Youthscape, Direction magazine and the Christian Teachers Journal.